Satchel Paige: Striking Out Jim Crow

Satchel Paige: Striking Out Jim Crow

"Ain’t no man can avoid being born average, but there ain’t no man got to be common." — Satchel Paige

Let them eat crow. James Strum once again dips into the baseball lore and belts a home-run with all the bases loaded. The Golem’s Mighty Swing was Sturm’s first tale of a Jewish travelling baseball team in the early part of the 20th century. With Satchel Paige’s graphic retelling of his story, I can say it a safe bet that James Sturm is the Ken Burns of comics. The true fans of the games will appreciate the story and art of a time long gone.

Baseball Hall-of-Famer Leroy "Satchel" Paige (1905?-1982) changed the face of the game in a career that spanned five decades. Much has been written about this larger-than-life pitcher, but when it comes to Paige, fact does not easily separate from fiction. He made a point of writing his own history . . . and then rewriting it. A tall, lanky fireballer, he was arguably the Negro Leagues’ hardest thrower, most entertaining storyteller, and greatest gate attraction. Now the Center for Cartoon Studies turns a graphic novelist’s eye to Paige’s story. Told from the point of view of a sharecropper, this compelling narrative follows Paige from game to game as he travels throughout the segregated South.